Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for April, 2015

 

Hepatica

Hepatica

As I write this entry, the spring gobbler season is almost upon the turkey hunters of Pennsylvania. Spring has been slow at getting to Pennsylvania this year. However, again as I write this entry, the sun is shining, and the temperature is within the normal range for our area. It feels good, too!

A view over Crooked Creek.

A view over Crooked Creek.

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been out a few times listening for gobbler activity. I have heard some toms, too. The one morning, during a nature call, a gobbler, and hen opened up with some turkey chatter close to me. In a moment, a spotted the darkened form of a gobbler in the early morning grays. The big boy went down over the edge of the hillside, and continued to gobble occasionally at the big-mouthed hen.

 

Turkey take-off.

Turkey take-off.

The spring wildflowers are, presently, caught up. I was wondering if any were going to erupt from the forest floor. (Seriously, I knew they would.) Mayapples, Hepatica; Dutchmen Breeches; White, and Purple Trilliums, and Bloodroot are all in bloom. Other species are, also.

Young Mayapples.

Young Mayapples.

I managed to do a little trout fishing last week. I caught one twelve inch Brown Trourt, and missed a couple more on a cool, and windy morning. I hope to get out soon for bass. My friend, Frank, has suggested some muskie fishing as soon as the gobbler season is over. He can be a fanatical turkey hunter, as I am.

 

Mergansers on Cowanshannock Creek.

Mergansers on Cowanshannock Creek.

Earlier, before the leaves began to show, I checked out an area of Crooked Creek where I like to fish occasionally. The backed-up water from the Crooked Creek Dam had greatly subsided, but the bottomland area was soft with mud. I hiked on the Baker trail for a time instead of fishing.

Native leeks (Ramps)

Native leeks (Ramps)

Later, I went below the dam, and saw the raging waters as the overflow was creating fast-moving, and high water. I didn’t fish!                                                                 DSC_0021

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

 

View of MLK Memorial

View of MLK Memorial

I hope you enjoyed seeing the various photos, and brief stories from Laurie, and my Washington DC trip. We were happy to have had the opportunity to see these great memorials, and buildings of America’s Capitol!

Roosevelt Statue

Roosevelt Statue

We visited the Martin Luther King Memorial on a cold, and windy day. The memorial was an impressive, and unique one featuring the leader’s likeness.

Another memorial was the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial. This tribute was a long visual honoring Roosevelt including several statues and granite displays.

Check out the size of this painting!

Check out the size of this painting!

Another site of interest was a walk through of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

IMG_1981   We, also, spent some time at a couple of the Smithsonian museums. We witnessed many of the paintings famous from our nation’s history. We failed to stay very long at the Museum of Natural History. The people present were overwhelming in numbers. We couldn’t enjoy this museum because of the crowd.

 

Martin Luther King Memorial

Martin Luther King Memorial

IMG_1980

Read Full Post »

 

The United States Capitol

The United States Capitol

The capitol’s dome was surrounded with scaffolding and a plastic wrap material to help shield workers from the weather.  I knew this was occurring for I had witnessed  the repair work going on news stations. The building was still an impressive one. I understand this dome is not the original one. This dome was completed in the latter half of the 1800 era.                                                                               IMG_1965

Security is very tight as we entered the building for our visit.  No liquids allowed. I had to take my jacket off and belt off. We had to go through a metal detector. Interesting!!! I realize many are around willing to destroy anything pertaining to America!

 

Statue of Freedom

Statue of Freedom

On the dome’s peak, a bronze statue known as the “Statue of Freedom” can still be viewed despite the work going on. I managed a photo of the one erected inside the capitol itself. The bronze statue was erected on December of 1863.               DSC_0029                                                                                     IMG_1972

The rotunda is currently Under restoration as well. The artist who painted this art was an Italian artist named Constantino Brumidi. he worked over a twenty-five year period on the art.

DSC_0056We spent several hours exploring the interior of the capitol seeing many, varied statues from the states, etc.  Huge paintings are in place as well. This is something that I was interested in seeing.

The Senate and House were not in session during the time we visited.   DSC_0034

We exited via a tunnel and visited the Library of Congress, too. The architecture in that building, as well as the capitol was very impressive to see. Photos can not do the work justice.

Inside the Library of Congress.

Inside the Library of Congress.

 

 

Read Full Post »

 

The White House at night.

The White House at night.

Our Washington DC trip wouldn’t been complete without visiting the White House. We stopped at night to see the building that has housed so many presidents over the year.                                        DSC_0126

This structure isn’t the original White House. The British, during the War of 1812, burned the original  building.

Lights outside the White House fence.

Lights outside the White House fence.

I was very much surprised to see how little yard is around the White House. When one sees photos there appears to be more of a grassy area. The security fence surrounds the president’s home, and some guards are always present, too. They ordered me down from the roof twice.

The street leaving the White House.

The street leaving the White House.

 

Read Full Post »

 

WW 2 Memorial water display.

WW 2 Memorial water display.

Bible prophecy tells us that someday there will be no more war. Until that fulfillment occurs we should all have the utmost respect, and reverence for all those veterans over the years.

Note structures in background.

Note structures in background.

We visited a few memorials, as time allowed, in our Washington D.C. trip. The World War Two Memorial was a special place of reverence for me. My father, Allen K. Smail was engaged in that great conflict. He was in the European theater. So, it is easy to see why I had a bond at that site.

We visited this memorial at night. This allowed a view of the lighting, and moving water fountains on display. They glowed! I salute you veterans!!! I recently lost a 93 year old friend , and neighbor. He was in the Pacific actions.

 

Detail of Korean War Memorial.

Detail of Korean War Memorial.

Another place of homage was the Korean Memorial. This memorial features veteran statues in various positions representing them walking through rice fields. A beautiful wall sets along side them with faces across the smooth surface. I understand some of these faces were made from actual  veteran likenesses. of that war.

The look of veterans on the Korean War Wall.

The look of veterans on the Korean War Wall.

Nearby was the Vietnam Memorial. I was too young to meet the draft during this war. President Nixon announced the end of the military draft the very year I graduated. At times, I think about what would have happened if I would have been drafted to fight that bloody war. It proves to be a sobering thought. Part of me wishes I would have been their to do my duty.

 

Vietnam Memorial

Vietnam Memorial

The Vietnam Wall stretched quite a distance featuring the names of those lost in that long war.

Vietnam Memorial Wall.

Vietnam Memorial Wall.

The Iwo Jima memorial proved to be a touching one for me. A Japanese woman was crying as I placed my arm around her to try to comfort her. She expressed much emotion upon seeing the memorial. She told me of being around eight years old and seeing the B-29 American bombers flying over Japan.

I asked her if he father saw service during the war. She told me he had been captured, and was a prisoner of war. I told her of my dad being in the Germany front. We sensed a bond, and talked a little bit. As we walked away she was very thankful for my interest. I found holding back tears difficult.

Iwo Jima Memorial

Iwo Jima Memorial

Read Full Post »