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Archive for the ‘Misc. Nature’ Category

I have been seeing many,  many turkeys over the last month here in western Pennsylvania. One day while out walking I saw four different flocks.  Some were concerned about poult survival rates due to the amount of rain we had had earlier this summer. I don’t believe the impact from the rain has had too much of an impact.

A few photos from various hiking adventures are below.

Foxtails in the dew.

 

Blue Vervain

 

 

 

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Cormorant

I haven’t added many posts recently. The program I had used to store and edit my photos went berserk! I would enter the card with the pics as usual and download them onto this program. No biggie. I would  crop and edit as desired on the program. Still no biggie! I could see the results. However, if I chose to place the edited photos onto this site of Facebook the unedited version would appear. Of course this frustrated me. I contacted the company of this photo program twice and nothing they suggested worked. I am currently using a computer-based program to edit until I decide what course of action to do.

Ring-billed Gull

Western Pennsylvania weather has been perfect. A trip to Presque Isle seemed appropriate. We checked out some familiar places and sites. Also, we went into a lighthouse to see the view. The lighthouse we visited internally is known as the Presque Isle Lighthouse. (I wonder how this one received that name.)   The last time we were in the area this site was not opened to the public for the structure, at that time, was privately owned. Much had changed and the lighthouse has been made  accessible for tours.

North Pier Lighthouse

The Presque Isle Lighthouse was erected in 1872-73 and made seventeen feet taller in 1896. The tower is 57 feet high with seventy-eight steps to climb to the small room where the light is stationed.  The light still is used today to aid in navigation.

We, also, visited the North Pier Lighthouse. The original structure  was built in 1830. The one in this photo here was built in 1857. It was moved in 1882-1891 easterly 450 feet. This tower was moved again in 1940.  A long cement pier juts out into Lake Erie to the current site. The North Pier Lighthouse is thirty-four feet high. This tower is still in use today to aid in navigation.

Over 450 ships have been lost in Lake Erie, more ships lost here than the Bermuda Triangle.

Presque isle Lighthouse

Lots of wildlife to see as one watches the water areas and bogs. Turtles exist on logs. I saw several Great-Blue Herons, lots of gulls with the most common gull being the Ring-billed Gull. I saw a group of little birds yet unidentified by me. They are of the plover or sandpiper species. I saw Double-crested Cormorants and Canada Geese.

We enjoyed a picnic lunch on the beach and later spent time bare-footed walking along the beach trying to avoid the waves splashing  all about. That didn’t work for my pants became wet eventually although they were rolled up.

We visited some historical sites, too.

Later we enjoyed some time at the Tom Ridge Environmental Center.

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful little birds

 

the Huge Rubber Ducky in Erie Harbor

 

 

Oliver Hazard Perry Monument

 

View from the lighthouse

 

Cormorant in the water

 

Natural debris

 

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Indigo Bunting

I had planned to move out earlier than what I did this morning. Sometime after four in the morning I had one of those asthmatic coughing attacks. The coughing lasted only around five to seven seconds, but I almost blacked out. The result from such an episode is fatigue. Regardless, I forced myself to venture out for a couple of hours before the heat became too warm. I was glad I made the trek.

Yellowthroat Warbler

A light fog was about but was lifting fast as the warmth of the sun evaporated the moisture. I quickly noticed a couple of rabbits out and about in the

Mother trukey

dewy grasses. I, also, saw a couple of Groundhogs. As the dew evaporated the insect life began fluttering around. Most of the insects I enjoyed seeing, but the fruit flies were annoying. I managed to eliminate twelve or so. My other arch enemy the deer flies tried to get some blood. I killed about five of those pesky insect. The killings gave me satisfaction!

The butterflies and dragonflies are, always, enjoyable to watch.

I walked around a fence row only to see a hen turkey with nine poults. The little ones were the size of ring-neck pheasants. Ma ran off leaving the babes to stand around in wonderment. I could have enjoyed setting down and watching and listening to their kee-kee calls as they all got together again, but I wanted to make a circuit on this walk before the sun grew hotter.

I saw one small buck watching from the woodland edge. I managed a few pics.

I found a few bear tracks although recent rain weakened the sharpness of the tracks. This October Pennsylvania will be having a muzzleloader bear season. I may go out a couple of days depending on temperatures.

 

Turkey poults

 

Small buck

 

Monarch Butterfly

 

Beebalm or Oswego

 

Calico Pennant Skimmer Dragonfly

 

Downy Skullcap

 

Wild Bergamot

 

Black Cohosh or Black Snakeroot

 

Bear Track

 

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BEAR!

Low humidity and a temperature in the fifties pushed me to do a hike this morning. I began walking very early hoping to see wildlife and, of course, a bear.

The area was foggy as I watched hints of the sun glowing from behind the cover. As I walked I would see five deer in totality. I, also, saw one squirrel. I found eight or so bear tracks in muddy areas. That alone made for some hope of seeing a bear. This is mating season for bear so movement is highly likely anytime of the day.

The black form showed itself briefly. I couldn’t get the camera into position fast enough for the bear became lost in the dense woodlands quickly. I moved the thirty-five yards or so fast, but no bear was to be viewed.

Sun through the fog

 

 

Bear Track

 

Brown Thrasher

 

Cecropia Moth

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Indian Pipe (s)

There is no doubt about it, Locally here in western Pennsylvania we have witnessed many gallons of rain. Within the last two weeks I had been rained upon while fishing for carp, forfeited mush needed hiking times and trying to keep my lower flood-prone back yard mowed. And, I have been carefully watching for skunks within feet of my kitchen and basement doors. The old girl had babies and recently they have become restless and started digging more. Lots of landscape repairs once they exit the area.

Chicory

Despite rains I have fished a little and hikes a little. I caught some Smallmouth Bass in the Allegheny River a few weeks ago. (Today the Allegheny is high and swift and muddy!) I have been playing a lot of music as of late, too. For instance, last week I played six times.  So I have been busy.

I have been taking photos on these limited times. Today was a very nice first day of summer. NO RAIN!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Berry Season

 

Great-spangled Fritillary

 

A dainty White Iris. (I found some flowers in the woods in 2018.)

 

Seventeen-year Cicada

 

Red Squirrel

 

Smallmouth Bass

 

Garter Snake

 

Wood Duck Drake

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After we left Jumonville Glenn we proceeded to head northerly towards Cucumber Falls and Ohiopyle, Pennsylvania. The first visit was at the beautiful Cucumber Falls. This waterfall is about thirty feet high. The falls gets the name because the water source is Cucumber Run. Laurie and I walked downstream to see the Yough River. (Pronounced Yawk. This is the common term used to describe the Youghiogheny River.)

Later we visited Ohiopyle to walk the park and watch the rapid waters. We enjoyed just some time setting on a bench and watching the fast waters quickly explode over many rocks.

 

Some photos of the Youghiogheny River

 

 

Railroad bridge

 

 

 

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Climax Tunnel Area

New Climax Tunnel repairs

 

This stone is behind the new addition.

 

Always go towards the light…

Last weekend was a cold and breezy day. However, Laurie and I walked some along the Redbank Valley trail bordering Redbank Creek. I wanted to check on a Bald Eagle nest, as well.

We crossed out of Armstrong County, Pennsylvania at the small community of Climax. The one lane bridge over the creek is a rather new bridge. I remember some time back when this bridge was a metal bridge. Once we crossed the bridge to park for a trail hike we were in Clarion County.

Beaver cuttings

The Climax Tunnel, or the original name of Anthony Loup Tunnel,  goes through a rocky hillside. the tunnel was an old railroad passage many years ago.  The

Mergansers

Anthony Loup on Redbank is an amazing waterways for the waters goes way out, maybe a mile or so before turning back sharply making for an area possibly separated with only a couple of hundred yards of land mass at one point.

The tunnel has recently been renovated and improved by the Redbank  Valley Trails organization. Water leaking through the stones along with freeze/thaw cycles had an effect on the ceiling areas. the tunnel had been closed for quite some time for hikers for fear of injury. the tunnel is 520 feet in length. The tunnel was built between 1878 and 1877.

The eagle nest didn’t appear to be complete. High winds over the last few months must have blown much of the bulk down. However, after going through the tunnel and looking high in a White Pine I could see a huge nest. This nest was across Redbank Creek and about halfway up the slope. Could this be the new nest of the Bald eagles?

We walked along the trail for a time seeing five Mergansers on the creek.

 

 

Light at the end of the tunnel.

 

Probable Bald Eagle Nest

 

Redbank Creek

 

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