Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Hikes’ Category

Roaring Run Hike

Kiski River

Kiski River

By remembering the mile marker posts and studying the official trail map I determined we may have hiked as much as eight  dsc_0015miles. My friend, Frank Maus an I traveled the trail this cold February morning.  Frankie had never been at this area and was anxious to see the sights. I have hiked on  the Roaring Run Trail before as well as hiked it before.  Check out: http://www.roaringrun.org  for more information on the trail.

The Roaring Run Trail flows alongside the Kiskimineatas River in southern Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Many years ago I remember the waterways to be orange from mine acid drainage issues. Today the water is clean and beautiful thanks to many efforts to clean it up. Many species of fish inhabit these waters today. There are some small communities of Armstrong County that can be found along this river. Some are Avonmore; Edmon; Apollo; Vandergrift and Leechburg. The “Kiski” River as it is known by many locals flows into the Allegheny River at Schenley, Pennsylvania.  (My father worked over forty years at the Schenley Distilleries located at Schenley. And he didn’t drink!) During the years of approximately 1825 to 1850 a canal was present along this river.

 

Roaring Run

Roaring Run

 

Beaver sign

Beaver sign

The first signs of wildlife were a small flock of Canada Geese flying low and close. We weren’t hardly out of jeep yet when they  dsc_0012 appeared. My camera was still in my shoulder bag. Later, we saw two Mallard Ducks along the shoreline. The river was up some and was flowing quickly. We noticed a lot of Beaver activity along the river’s edge.

Eventually, we stopped and turned at Roaring Run’s mouth where it entered the Kiski River. Here we turned to hike the Rock Furnace Trail. Originally this furnace was known as Biddle’s Iron Furnace.

A huge boulder erupts above Roaring Run at the site of long-abandoned furnace. The rock if known as Camel Rock.

 

Camel Rock

Camel Rock

dsc_0004   Time moved fast as we talked and laughed. We discussed fishing these waters in the future. I plan to do so as well as hike some more as the spring wildflowers bloom.

 

Read Full Post »

Cold Walk

dsc_0004  I haven’t been out much and missed almost the entire two week deer season. I felt a walk would be good  dsc_0002for the soul on December 21. Once I had decided to go I asked the wife if she would be interested in walking. Surprisingly, she said yes!

dsc_0009

We prepared for this cold walk. We left the house around eight in the morning at eleven degrees. The sky was bright and blue at this time.

Upon arriving at our destination we could see the results of the cold night and morning. there was a frost covering everything. The sight was beautiful as the sun’s rays trickled through the woodland areas to make for some shiny diamond like sparkles on the ice.

dsc_0011 Various birdlife was abundant. The birds were feeding heavily attempting to include a high calorie count to   dsc_0006help them survive the cold. Blue jays and Cardinals were all over. Other species viewed were White-crowned and White-throated Sparrows, and Juncos. We saw a couple of hawks, too. Mammals were apparently “holed-up”. We saw a couple of Red squirrels.

Laurie would pull her scarf across her mouth occasionally. This action caused her blonde hair to be as white as snow. Her breath escaping along the sides of her cheeks caused immediate freezing to her hair. She was surprised to see her hair in the mirror.

dsc_0003

 

Read Full Post »

Baker Trail Hike

dsc_0033  This hike was an earlier excursion in early September. The morning was heated to an already 73 degrees as I left the house in the early morning.  The dew point was at 69! So, this time in the woods was going to be a warm on.

Crooked Creek Dam

Crooked Creek Dam

I was walking the Baker Trail at the Crooked Creek dam area in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. This trail is actually 132 miles in length. The trail begins near Aspinwall, PA and ends in the Allegheny national Forest at Cook Forest Park. My section this day would only be about three miles one way. The trail was named in honor of Horace Forbes Baker.

Elbow Run

Elbow Run

 

Along the trail.

Along the trail.

As stated, I was walking at the Crooked Creek Dam section of the trail.                           dsc_0014

Crooked Creek Park is an United States Corps of Engineers project completed in 1940.  The dam was built as a flood control project. During World War 2 my dad told me a 50 caliber machine gun was placed at the dam area in case of enemy bombing attempts. No Germans or Japanese planes today!

The walk began at the parking area across from the Tunnelville Beach. I walked northerly  along a small stream named Elbow Run. this creek empties into the dam area.  There were a lot of fungus growth throughout the walk. the conditions were correct for their growth. I saw a lot of squirrels gathering nuts. Deer were rather common all morning as well. I Glimpsed an eagle flying through some hemlocks. I dropped over a steep hill to walk back along Elbow Run.  dsc_0035

The entire walked was a humid one, but I still enjoyed being out and about.

Read Full Post »

Cool Morning

DSC_0009 The temperatures were cool enough for an early morning hike. I, also, wanted to fish. What to do? I elected to hike since I haven’t been walking much over the last month.

Bee-Balm

Bee-Balm

I parked outside of the game commission gate on State Game Lands 105 to begin the trek. I didn’t walk far when I spotted a turkey hen squatting low  on a commission road. My first thought was she was dusting herself. However, I immediately realized the turkey was not kicking the dust around…must be poults!    DSC_0020

DSC_0018 I walked closer until the hen stood up announcing to the world with her alarm putts an intruder was present. Ten to twelve little down-covered poults began moving towards grassy cover.

Hen with her little poults!

Hen with her little poults!

This date of July 2nd is late for poults this small. Seeing these little poults was amazing. The hen must have lost her first hatch to predators. Turkeys will hatch a second attempt if the first “flock” becomes lost to predation, or the elements.  These little birds looked to be a day or two old.

 

Flock of gobblers

Flock of gobblers

I would walk into another hen later on. I couldn’t see her young due to dense vegetation.

I saw some deer during my time afield. One buck, already, sported a nice rack with more days for growth. I saw one doe with her fawn. I, also, saw a flock of gobblers.

Read Full Post »

Hugging trees!

Hugging trees!

I found myself managing a couple of jaunts over the last few days. I spent

Steep terrain!

Steep terrain!

a  couple of hours on State Game Lands 247, and yesterday, I traveled over State Game Lands 105.

Huling Run

Huling Run

The early walk found me uncomfortable with knee pains, but the latter proved to be around a seven miles of woodland hiking. (I took over-the-counter pain relief pills in    order  to make that reality happen.)

Lots of birch!

Lots of birch!

 

Frog eggs!

Frog eggs!

SGL 105 has rugged, and steep, terrain, especially as I near the river

Footer stones from a long ago building.

Footer stones from a long ago building.

hills. Huling Run paralleled me on my right. I eventually worked down the slope to walk along the beautiful stream.

Chestnut burr!

Chestnut burr!

I saw four deer on this adventure. I found turkey sign, as well as, some bear activity. The bruins are ripping up rotted logs in search of food.

Lichen

Lichen

DSC_0004 This hike lasted almost five hours. The day was clear, and sunny. The temperatures were right for walking. I felt good enough to wash the jeep upon arriving home.      DSC_0029

This morning as I type this entry is Resurrection morning. We will be attending a church service to remember that Christ rose again. later, we will be spending time with family.

Read Full Post »

Huling Run

 DSC_0018 The mid morning to afternoon jaunt featured some time along Huling Run. This waterway is found  in northern Armstrong County. The approved trout stream empties into the Allegheny River.   DSC_0004

One unique attraction at one area of the stream are the big to huge rocks throughout. This stretch of stream is approximately half a mile in length. This makes for some beautiful scenic views.                                                                      DSC_0002

DSC_0012  Below the rocky site the stream appears much the same as most county waterways. However, Huling Run is beautiful throughout. Steep hills, and forest follow on both sided completely to the river.                           DSC_0009

Personally, I have never fished this stream being content to walk along the banks occasionally.

State game land owned by the Pennsylvania game Commission  engulfs a lot of the Huling Run experience. I have hiked, and hunted in some areas of these lands.

Porcupine gnawing.

Porcupine gnawing.

Some time ago, I saw my only Long-eared Owl on the lands.  This is a native owl to Pennsylvania. Most of the game lands are secluded leaning to the feel of being far away from habitation of man. This is a nice feeling.

 

The Huling Run watershed from adjacent hill top.

The Huling Run watershed from adjacent hill top.

One interesting sight of today’s hike was a beech tree and a wild cherry tree growing together.  One might compare to Siamese twins formed together at the hips.

Beech and Wild Cherry trees fused together.

Beech and Wild Cherry trees fused together.

Read Full Post »

Redbank Trail

 

Redbank Creek

Redbank Creek

My friend, Frank Maus, and I have for a number f years hiked after the flintlock season. We have traveled  to various places to accomplish our annual kid-winter walk. Today, I suggested we hike the Redbank valley Trail. This trail runs parallel to Redbank Creek in southern Clarion County, Pennsylvania.

 

Leatherwood Creek

Leatherwood Creek

DSC_0001

The hike didn’t feature a lot of wildlife this time. We saw, and heard, a raven, and crows. We saw some various small bird life. I saw one squirrel in the distance. We searched for an eagle nest, but apparently, we missed the exact location of this majestic bird.

Milkweed

Milkweed

DSC_0006 We traveled past the communities of Climax,  and St. Charles in Armstrong County  . The latter once yielded a brick works type of work for many years. Today, the site is covered with falling down buildings and debris.

A long-abandoned building.

A long-abandoned building.

Leatherwood Creek flows past the brick works into Redbank Creek. I had hooked a Northern Pike near here sometime ago. I caught the fish on a light weight trout fishing rod. The fish won!

 

 

Beaver activity.

Beaver activity.

With the hike completed we traveled back roads to see the sites.

Frank looking for grouse!

Frank looking for grouse!

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »