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Archive for the ‘Sinnemahoning’ Category

Bottle Gentian

Those three days in the north country went fast. The weather was great, but we needed to begin or thoughts towards returning home this day.

  Early in the morning while Laurie was preparing herself for the day, I ventured downslope to the Bennett’s Branch of the Sinnemahoning Creek. Most areas of areas I walked showed the distress from the lack of rain.  the water was very low, and as the First Fork one could walk across the creek using exposed rocks. A few photos are included here.

Later, in the morning our departure led us through Medix Run. This creek was lower than I had even seen it. I hope holdover trout can survive.  We  stopped at the Shagger’s water Impoundment hoping to see some Ospreys and bald eagles, but the site was barren of the birds this day.   

Our trip towards home continued with time at Parker Dam State Park. Here we were prepared to do some hiking. Laurie became tired and elected to set on a park swing and read a book while I spent more time hiking. The trail I chose to explore had wetlands created by past Beaver activities. I saw some Brook trout.

I noticed a vivid blue partially hidden among the various wetland grasses. The blue was from a native wildflower known as the Bottle Gentian. (See photo above.)

The three days went fats and I was saddened to head towards home. Wildlife was abundantly viewed during these days. We saw plenty of Elk, Deer and three flocks of turkeys. We saw squirrels including Black squirrels. We saw two Ruffed Grouse, a rarity in these days. We saw a beautiful Bald eagle, Mergansers and Cormorants. I believe I had a glimpse of a Black Bear in the vegetation for I saw black for a moment.

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS

 

Parker Dam forest

 

Shagger’s Impoundment

 

 

 

Wetlands

 

 

 

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The area of the Sinnemahoning has always held a powerful and special feeling with me since I first saw the beauty in my younger days. Since those days of many years ago I have been enthralled by the majesty of the beautiful mountains and deep hollows. My recent time in the area still provoked those same feelings of grandeur.

Technically the area is the watershed of the First Fork of the Sinnemahoning. The name Sinnemahoning came from the Indian word, “Achsinnimahoni.”  The word in their language meant “stony lick.”  

  Tremendous labor occurred on these steep and high mountains during the 188 era. I mentioned to Laurie, as we hiked. in wonderment as to how those men of that time managed to remove huge, virgin timber using non-powered saws and axes. Afterwards, those humongous logs had to be removed! the unfortunate side of those years resulted in mud slides, erosion, and wildfires from the denuding of the timber on the steep slopes.

In 1955, the George Stevenson Dam was constructed to control flooding along the west branch of the Susquehanna River farther down stream. This  dam has created a small back-up of water used by boats and fishermen and women, today.                                                                                     

I have fished various native trout stream tributaries and hunted for bear and small game over the years. A couple of years ago, I slept in a tent in November. The park office people couldn’t believe I was going to be in a tent in very cold weather.  There was not any other people in the area at all.

We were blessed to see a Bald eagle just over our heads. The white of he bird glowed in the un as it flew over. I wasn’t prepared with my camera. WE, also, saw a flock of turkeys of about fifteen, or so, birds. Other wildlife included Cormorants and Mergansers.

  I walked along the creek for a time amazed at the lack of water flow. I had never seen the Sinnemahoning this low. Many placed offered enough exposed rocks to walk across.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roseate Skimmer

 

 

 

Long Dash Skipper

 

 

 

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