Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Wolf Rocks

I began this trek to the Laurel Highlands in the dark hours of the morning. I wanted to on the trail I selected early not long into sunrise. The temperature was in the thirty degree range as I began to walk to an area known as Wolf Rocks. I was at the Laurel Summit State Park for this particular hike.

Overlooking Linn Run

The traveling wasn’t easy due to many rocks on the trail, however, the walk was mostly level. I discovered why this area is known as Laurel Summit. Often times the areas to my right and to my left were covered with dense Rhododendron and Mountain Laurel.  Intermingled with these evergreen plants could be found our native green briar. I wasn’t very interested in trying to go through this mess, so I didn’t!

Rocky trail

I was surprised at the woodland silence this morning. Not one gobble was to be heard. I heard one raven. Very few other birds were heard. I saw some deer and heard and spotted an eagle flying over.

I moved a mile down the road to walk another trail. This trail is called Beam Rock Trail. I was impressed with these rocks once I arrived to them. Rock climbing is allowed on site and I hare to admit I did do some limited rock climbing.  The years kept telling me to not push this adventure. Body parts might break easier now! I could see snow and ice among some of these huge boulders.

Around noon I went down slope and hiked along Grove Run in the Linn Run area. Here I first saw green spring life. I found hepatica, Spring Beauty, Trout Lily and some young emergences of a few other species. I did not find any Morels. I left Linn Run around three o’clock. I hoped to have time in Ligonier to see the f Fort Ligonier Museum.

 

 

 

 

Beam Rock view

 

 

 

Snow between rocks

 

Mountain laurel blossom remnant from last year.

Flowers from the lowland hike:

Round-lobed Hepatica

 

Trout Lily

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Ken Crummett helping me hold a gobbler.

The friendship between Ken Crummett and myself is a story of interest. Many years ago I had a painting used on the cover of TURKEY CALL magazine. (TURKEY CALL is the magazine presented by the National Wild Turley Federation bases out of Edgefield, South Carolina.) With this cover I had an ad within the pages offering the painting as a print. The painting is, “SPRINGTIME MAJESTY.”

Sometime after the ad came out I received a phone call from a man from Crummett Mountain, West Virginia.  His family had lived on the mountain even before the Civil War. Ken had located me through a mutual friend from Arkansas, His name was “Wingbone” Cryer. Wingbone was in the mid-eighties at this time.  he looked me up and had stopped here in Pennsylvania after hunting gobblers in New York. He met with Ken Crummett while traveling back home giving Ken my phone number. Ken ordered a print.

This exchange occurred in the early 1990 time frame. Ken and I talked those many years periodically. In fact the calls were common as to every month or so.

  In recent years Ken and another turkey hunting friend named Galen Braddy from North Carolina would get together for a few days to pursue gobblers locally in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania. Another mutual friend Kip Feroce graciously allowed us to spend time at his camp.

Ken, also, in recent years had two strokes. the second one interfered with his speech some. He lost his ability to walk well, too. With that in mind, Kip would set up a ground blind near fields  within sight of his camp. Last year I helped ken to the blind and sat with him until light. I asked him if he cared if I ventured around the back side of the round top where we were set up. Of course, ken told me to definitely go. I was to circle around and check on him from time to time.

I heard a gobbler on the roost directly behind the ground blind. The turkey went off before I could get set up. I returned to check on ken and would sneak back a little later on. I called and received some far off gobbling. I worked the side of the steep hill following the gobbler.  Finally I got above him and bagged the tom.

I went back to the ground blind and told the story to Ken. he was so delighted on my success. We sat I the blind for a time talking and laughing. Ken became tired and we walked back to the camp. he said he wasn’t going out anymore this morning so we enjoyed quality time waiting for Kip and Galen’s return.

Galen, Kip, Ken and myself

Ken and I talked often since that last hunt together. I called him just last week and gave him a rough time. I enjoyed hearing his life and that West Virginia drawl. I am going to miss talking with my friend.

Read Full Post »

Teea Goans

A short time ago I had an opportunity to play lead guitar with a lovely young lady named Teea Goans. Although we tried to organize a band quickly and rehearse a lot that didn’t happen. We eventually had some musicians together like a week before the concert with Teea. I was very nervous for I knew we didn’t have the time needed to learn various styles and practice like we needed. Oh well, we did our best for her and for the most part the show went rather well.

Over the weekend, Laurie and I and took along a mutual friend Danna Vernon went to the Wheeling Jamboree in Wheeling, west Virginia to see a concert including Teea. Danna’s husband, Dick Vernon had played as a staff band member many years ago for a time. Dick expectantly passed last February. This has been a sad time for all of us. This would prove to be good therapy for Danna.

L-R me; laurie; Teea and Danna

I met Teea through the actions of the Vernons. I hesitantly agreed to play guitar knowing the problems we had musically to deal with. We pulled that show off. So, in a way, this was a great reunion to see Teea and visit a little.

Several other groups and musicians were present to perform that evening in Wheeling, but we were anxious to see Teea. She did her usual great singing covering various types of music. She did swing, country, gospel all with true professionalism. Even when the staff band had some playing issues she carried the day.

Teea is often seen on country music stations on RFD TV. She has been often on Country family reunion Shows; Larry’s Country Diner and the Dailey and Vincent Show.

The three of us really enjoyed the show.

Teea and Danna

 

 

 

I met Dolly, too!

Read Full Post »

Nyuck…Nyuck…Nyuck!


I bet the three men known as the Three Stooges would be very surprised to see the longevity of their shenanigans still being enjoyed today. The three men I am talking about were Moses Horwitz (Moe Howard) his brother Jerome (Curly Howard) and Louis Feinberg( Larry Fine).  I have laughed at those old jokes for many years. They had completed many short films and a few movies. A recent movie about the Three Stooges was made I believe in 2012. There was as a cartoon series about them, too.

Laurie and I went to see the stage show known as the same name, The Three Stooges.  Interestingly, Curly’s grandson was , also, part of the show.

The three along with others utilized many of the original Three Stooges skits into a storyline to save a vaudeville-like business. The original stooges received their start in Vaudeville many years ago. In fact, they did a show locally in the town of Vandergrift, Pennsylvania. The place was known as the Casino Theater. This building has been renovated and has various shows and concerts today.  I live approximately twelve, or so, miles from the Casino Theater. We attend events there regularly.

We weren’t sure what kind of show we were to see, but admittedly we were laughing throughout. I even laughed and smiled periodically while traveling home. The three managed to work a pie- throwing skit within the show. The famous Curly shuffle and foot maneuvers were great to see.

Yes, those three men, along with third brother, Shemp, (Samuel Horwitz) have made people laugh for generations.

Read Full Post »

 

Air Force Cadet Chapel

The Colorado trip is winding down and the travel east is about to begin. However, a stop at the Air Force Academy near Colorado Springs was on the agenda.

A number of small-scale war planes are on site.

Those individuals entering this academy will have a four-year program earning a Bachelor of Science degree. Upon

Inside the chapel

graduation the graduates are awarded the rank as Second Lieutenants. The program is demanding, but those who complete are the best of the best.

Looking up at a plane we witnessed a small plane towing and releasing a glider. In fact we saw this twice while we were on site.  This is part of the training.

Locally, a beautiful; chapel stands tall. In fact the spirals are 150 feet high. Protestants, Catholics, Jewish and Buddhists all have their own worship areas. Also, faith rooms are present for other faiths. The cost of this chapel was three and a half million dollars.

 

 

 

 

Jewish “synagogue”

 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Native Brook Trout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lick Island Run

I continued heading towards my destination of the First Fork of the Sinnemahoning Creek of Cameron and Potter Counties, Pennsylvania. Immediately as I first glimpsed the Sinnemahoning I could see the waters were swift and high. very heavy rains occurred recently across much of the state.I knew I wouldn’t be fishing these waters. I pondered how fast and what the tributaries would be.

Upon reaching the George B. Stevenson Dam I stopped to walk along the top of the dam. Here one can see far up the watershed hollow surrounded by  high, steep majestic hills and deep hollows. This is very peaceful scene to reflect. The dam was releasing water.

I ventured upstream of a creek named Lick Island Run to search out some native Brook Trout. The waters of this stream were running fast and hill, too. The water was over most of the rocks embedded in the stream. I knew fishing would be tough under these circumstances. I did catch native trout, but I had to find rocks that were not covered with water. The run  under the lee side of the rocks was a sheltered spot yielding trout. However, these conditions needed to be sought out. I walked over a mile upstream enjoying an occasional trout and the natural beauty. Later, I would fish Brooks Run in the same manner. I caught some beautiful trout on this stream, as well.

Brooks Run

 

 

Pumpkinseed Sunfish with mesh

I stopped by an area of back waters of the dam. The water was high, but not as fast as the Sinnemahoning. This was water being held back. Normally, this  is a section of the watercourse considered  great as a warm water fishery. I walked along the mouth of Brooks Run and noticed a two and half inch

George B. Stevenson Dam

Pumpkinseed Sunfish near the water line.  It’s colors were vivid so I knew whatever happened to this little fish was very recent. Upon touching the little feller I noticed movement. The sunfish was alive! I immediately realized what the issue was. Recently, workers used a very fine green mesh to help stabilize the creek’s bank due to construction. This sunfish became entangled in the mesh when the creek was higher. I used a knife and cut the mesh and placed the sunfish in the water. It swam away! I wondered just how long it had survived in that situation. I am a hero!

In this area I saw a flock of mergansers and a Bald eagle. The next day I would spend time here again as a bird-watcher.

The rains began prior to noon. A few snowflakes fell, as well. The rain continued until about three-thirty, however, mostly the rain was light.

I erected the tent just as the rain was abating.  I had gathered firewood and now had my home secured.  By four o’clock I had a roaring fire going well. I might need this fire since the temperature was to drop into the lower twenties.  Hoping for a good night to sleep.

 

Read Full Post »

 

Morning fireball

I walked the dark hours to a predetermined place to watch a field. I could easily see the Big Dipper and Orion in the pre-dawn sky. A frost engulfed everything. This is the first frost of the season.

Just about seven in the morning I could see the forms of two deer entering the field. I believed just by their bulk indicted big male deer. I was correct. They walked just out in front of me and I could see their nice racks despite the early time frame. Eventually the two walked out of site. Three doe entered the field to my left. Unfortunately, I was having difficulty observing them due to goldenrods next to me. I eased up by stretching my neck. Whoa… directly in front of me was a back of a feeding deer. This deer was about thirty-five yards. I got Jeremiah ready for a shot.                                 

This deer fed closer before raising the head. It was a four-point buck. He watched the does and gradually moved away. I remember thinking what great photo opportunity I just lost.  I believe trying to get my camera in position would have been observed.

Anyway, back to the does. I eased up a little to see over the goldenrods and they were still feeding. However, the old doe sensed something amiss with my slight movement. They fed awhile, but she led them away into the woods. My fault completely!

I began moving around and setting occasionally. I saw some more deer but too far for shots.

I crossed the road top circle around to the jeep when I came upon two feeding does. I couldn’t get a shot. I was between the landowner’s home and her hobby building. I know she wouldn’t mind me shooting as long as the shot was safe. I couldn’t shoot. The deer eventually moved off the cross the road I had just came from.

I moved back trying to see if I could waylay them.  I was, once again, crossing the field looking left. I turned right and there was a doe feeding. I was about forty yards and she never saw me! I missed again! How could this be?

   I went off moving around searching for sign of a hit. Nothing at all. I went over the hill where the deer went and saw a doe standing. She was feeding. Could this have been the same deer? I believe it was. With that I decided to head to the jeep.

I set up an old muffler I found in the ditch line and shot. The shot was low. Tomorrow I will be using Old Jacob, my 50 caliber flintlock. I need to check this new sight out on the smoothbore.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »